Testing the radiocarbon dating method

By knowing the half-life of C-14 and estimating how many C-14 atoms the organism contained before it died, we can calculate the age of an object or creature at time of death.

The ultimate tree-ring chronology is the 'master' timeline of bristlecone pines - a chronology spanning more than 9,000 years.

It seems that Dig Ventures weren’t the only ones promoting groundbreaking innovation last week.

A new radio carbon dating technique looks set to join Digital Dig Team as one of the biggest tech innovations set to revolutionise field archaeology this year.

Carbon dating is used to work out the age of organic material — in effect, any living thing.

The technique hinges on carbon-14, a radioactive isotope of the element that, unlike other more stable forms of carbon, decays away at a steady rate.

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Methuselah Methuselah is a bristlecone pine, and the world's oldest living thing.

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